Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

News Release | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Obama Administration Finalizes Historic Clean Car Standards

Phoenix —Today the Obama administration finalized new clean car standards that will double the fuel efficiency of today’s vehicles by 2025, drastically reducing emissions of carbon pollution and cutting oil use in Arizona and nationwide. The standards will cover new cars and light trucks in model years 2017-2025, and require those vehicles to meet the equivalent of a 54.5 miles-per-gallon standard by 2025.

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News Release | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Obama Administration to Protect Americans’ Health by Setting Carbon Pollution Standards for New Power Plants

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed historic new limits on carbon pollution from new power plants. Carbon pollution fuels global warming, which leads to poor air quality that triggers asthma attacks and other respiratory problems.

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Headline

Grand Canyon mining controversy could affect Ariz. Senate race

The Obama administration's decision to ban new uranium mining claims on more than 1 million acres around Grand Canyon National Park is already playing in Arizona's Senate race.

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Bill to protect Arizona State Parks revenue a step closer to law

A bill that would protect Arizona State Parks revenue from legislative sweeps skipped over the Senate Appropriations Committee on Tuesday, taking it one step closer to becoming law.

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Report | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

Weather disasters kill or injure hundreds of Americans each year and cause billions of dollars in economic damage. The risks posed by some types of weather-related disasters will likely increase in a warming world. Scientists have already detected increases in extreme precipitation events and heat waves in the United States, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recently concluded that global warming will likely lead to further changes in weather extremes.

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