Solar power is a growing American success story

Hundreds of thousands of Americans have gone solar and millions more are ready to join their ranks so all of us can power our lives and our communities with clean, renewable, local energy. The barriers to solar are falling faster than ever, too, with more and more cities, states and companies adopting innovative pro-solar policies that have made solar cheaper and easier to install.

That’s why we have 10 times more solar power in the U.S. today than we did in 2010, enough to power more than 5 million homes, with another home going solar every two minutes, as of the end of 2015.

What are we up against? 

Yet just as solar is about to reach a tipping point, some utilities and other special interests want to throw new obstacles in the way. Our Solar for All campaign is working to knock those barriers out of the way so more Americans can go solar.

We’re working with our national network to urge mayors, governors and others to set ambitious solar goals and commitments, offer new solar incentives, and promote new community solar programs. And we’re mobilizing people to counter the utilities and other special interests who want to make solar more expensive and harder to install.

We’re fighting attacks

And we’re winning. In just the past year, we’ve turned back attacks on solar in Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico and won new commitments to solar in Austin and Houston, Athens and Atlanta, and New York State and California, among other places. Over the last 10 years, we’ve helped establish dozens of pro-solar programs, including the biggest: California’s Million Solar Roofs Initiative.

What can you do? 

We want you to join us by showing your support for solar. You can send an email to your local officials, write a letter to your local newspaper, attend one of our solar forums, or join us at a news conference or other special event.

Whatever you can do, the time for action is now. Solar is at a tipping point. If we keep winning more pro-solar policies, we’ll see millions more Americans go solar in the next decade, putting us on a path to a 100% renewable future. If we let utilities and other special interests get in the way, that future will remain out of reach as solar sputters and stalls.

Together, we can achieve Solar for All

We can do this. Together, we can bring more solar power to our homes, our communities, our churches and schools, our workplaces and our lives—and leave a cleaner, healthier world for kids growing up today and future generations.

Solar For All Updates

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Feds target 237,100 acres in Arizona for renewable energy projects

The Bureau of Land Management has recommended 237,100 acres of public land in Arizona are suitable for renewable energy development, part of an effort to speed up the process for clean-energy companies looking to set up shop in the state.

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Editorial fumbles point of nuclear power report

Your recent editorial "Water should not be political football" fumbled the point of the "Too Close To Home: Nuclear Power and the Threat to Drinking Water" report authored by the Arizona PIRG Education Fund and Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center.

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Handful of renewable energy bills proposed by Democrats

Some House Democrats have designed or revived initiatives this session to promote renewable energy, despite anticipated opposition from Republicans.

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News Release | Environment Arizona

Environmental Day Brings Over 100 Citizen Advocates to the Capitol

Today at the Arizona State Capitol, more than 100 people from 25 different legislative districts and representing more than 20 groups met with their state legislators in support of environmental protection and conservation programs.

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News Release | Environment Arizona

New Report Cites Relationship between Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant Accident & Drinking Water Contamination for Arizonans

The drinking water for many Arizonans could be at risk of radioactive contamination from a leak or accident at the Palo Verde nuclear power plant, says a new report released today by the Arizona Public Interest Research Group (Arizona PIRG) and Environment Arizona.

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