News Release | Environment America Research & Policy Center

New Dirty Water Rule puts America’s drinking water and rivers at risk

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has finalized a rule that leaves half the nation’s wetlands and thousands of streams -- which help provide millions of Americans with drinking water -- without the federal protection of the Clean Water Act.

News Release | Environment Arizona

Arizona’s largest electric utility commits to 100% clean energy

Arizona Public Service (APS), the state’s largest utility, committed today to a goal of 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2050. The plan also includes an interim goal of getting 45 percent of the utility’s power from renewable sources like solar and wind by 2030. That makes APS the first major U.S. utility to voluntarily set a target of tripling its renewable energy generation by the end of the decade.

News Release | Environment America

Environment America lauds the U.S. House’s passage of three sweeping public lands bills

“Some places are too special, too hallowed to allow the destruction and pollution that comes with uranium and coal mining, or oil and gas drilling. [T]he House is rightly embracing the value of conservation -- protecting our iconic national parks, safeguarding our public lands and drinking water, and establishing new wilderness areas for future generations."

News Release | Environment Arizona Research & Policy Center

Study: Solar power delivers more than clean energy to Arizona

Arizonans benefit from solar panels in important ways that are often overlooked by policymakers, according to The True Value of Solar: Measuring The Benefits of Rooftop Solar Power, a study released today by Environment Arizona Research and Policy Center and Frontier Group. As the Arizona Corporation Commission considers increasing the amount of renewable energy powering the state and expanding rooftop solar, commissioners should weigh the full value that solar energy delivers.

News Release | Environment America

Statement: Tongass National Forest’s natural treasures are imperiled by Department of Agriculture’s proposal to opening area to logging

"Logging in this ancient forest would not only have a ruinous impact on biodiversity and wildlife habitats but would also greatly diminish its role in mitigating climate change. [S]ome places are simply too important to destroy."

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